Kristin Kopp

Kristin Kopp
Associate Professor of German, Faculty Affiliate with UMC Black Studies Program, Director of Graduate Studies in German
218A Strickland Hall
573-882-3367
PDF Documents: 
Dr. Kopp crossing the top of the Stilfser Joch

Dr. Kopp crossing the top of the Stilfser Joch

The Stilfser Joch in the Italian Alps

The Stilfser Joch in the Italian Alps

 
Berlin School Glossary: An ABC of the New Wave in German Cinema

Berlin School Glossary: An ABC of the New Wave in German Cinema

Germany's Wild East: Constructing Poland as Colonial Space

Germany's Wild East: Constructing Poland as Colonial Space

Germany, Poland and Postmemorial Relations: In Search of a Livable Past

Germany, Poland and Postmemorial Relations: In Search of a Livable Past

Peter Altenberg: Ashantee.  Afrika und Wien um 1900

Peter Altenberg: Ashantee. 
Afrika und Wien um 1900

Die Großstadt und das Primitive: Text, Politik, Repräsentation

Die Großstadt und das Primitive:
Text, Politik, Repräsentation

 
Education: 

 Ph.D. 2001, University of California, Berkeley

Research Interests: 

My research focuses on German and Austrian colonial and imperial discourses of the past, and on developing strategies for overcoming their legacies in the present. Because education itself is perhaps our best tool in this process, much of my research overlaps with the courses I teach.

Colonial/Postcolonial Space in Europe?

In 2012, I published Germany’s Wild East: Constructing Poland as Colonial Space, a book that shows how it was possible to represent Eastern Europe using the language and images that European colonialists had developed to depict the people and lands they colonized overseas. At a time when many Germans desired the expansion of their nation’s eastern border into Slavic lands (roughly 1890-1945), they came to depict the (previously “white” and “European”) Slavs as primitive and barbaric (and often “black”). By insisting on this alternative identity for the Slavs, German expansionists could claim the need for German colonial intervention in lands that were right next door.

I continue to find the German-Polish relationship fascinating, and have published articles on the lingering traces of colonial discourse in contemporary German depictions of Poland, and co-edited Germany, Poland, and Postmemorial Relations: In Search of a Livable Past(2012, with Joanna Ni?y?ska). 

Now, I am following the highly contentious debate regarding contemporary Poland’s identity (can it be considered to be a “postcolonial” nation?) and thinking through the implications of this explanatory model for the former GDR.

Black Central European Studies Network (BCESN)

The BCESN is an international group of scholars who want to see the field of Black Studies more actively research and teach the history of the African diaspora in Europe. 

With this goal in mind, we are currently constructing a database of primary and secondary materials and developing teaching units as a resource for educators interested in integrating our material into their courses. In 2015, our syllabus on “The History of Blacks in Germany” won awards for the best new syllabus in the field of German studies, and I am excited to be able to offer this course at the University of Missouri!

Colin Ross: Interwar Travel and Geopolitics

Funded by the Ludwig Boltzmann Institut für Geschichte und Gesellschaft (The Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for History and Society) in Vienna, this international research group is investigating the career and writings of Colin Ross, a Viennese travel writer, filmmaker, and journalist of the interwar period. Often traveling with his family and featuring his children prominently in his work, Ross created a specific “brand” for his films, publications, and lectures (“Mit Kind und Kamera durch Afrika”). Yet with Hitler’s rise to power, Ross’s work increasingly espoused Nazi ideology and the pursuit of expanding Germany’s world power. In addition to locating and assembling the traces of Ross’s archive, our project intends to analyze the political role played by his travel.

Frequently Taught Courses: 

Recent courses offered at the undergraduate level:

  • Eerie Tales in German and Austrian Literature
  • Advanced Composition and Conversation: Germany Looks East
  • The History of Blacks in Germany
  • Senior Capstone: Nazi Ideology and Propaganda

Recent courses offered at the graduate level:

  • German and Austrian Colonial Literature
  • Teaching College Literature: Ethics and Pedagogical Practice
  • German Film: Angst in Weimar
  • Independent Study: Postcolonial Eastern Europe
  • Independent Study: German Colonialism and China
Recent Publications: 

Please see my CV for the full listing.

Books

Roger Cook, Lutz Koepnick, Kristin Kopp, and Brad Prager (eds.) Berlin School Glossary: An ABC of the New Wave in German Cinema (Bristol/Chicago: Intellect Books, 2013)

Kristin Kopp, Germany’s Wild East: Constructing Poland as Colonial Space (University of Michigan Press, 2012).

Kristin Kopp and Joanna Nizynska, eds., Germany, Poland and Postmemorial Relations: In search of a Livable Past (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).

Roger Cook, Lutz Koepnick, Kristin Kopp, Brad Prager, Carsten Strathausen, eds., Revolver Kino (Intellect Books, forthcoming).

Kristin Kopp, and Werner Michael Schwarz. Peter Altenberg: Ashantee. Afrika und Wien um 1900(Vienna: Löcker Verlag, 2008).

Kristin Kopp and Klaus Müller-Richter, eds. Die Großstadt und das Primitive. Text, Politik, Repräsentation (Stuttgart: Metzler Verlag) 2004.


Selected Articles

“Gray Zones: On the Inclusion of ‘Poland’ in the Study of German Colonialism,” in Michael Perraudin and Jürgen Zimmerer (eds.), German Colonialism and National Identity (New York: Routledge, 2011), pp. 33-42. 

“Arguing the Case for a Colonial Poland,” in Volker Langbehn and Mohammad Salama (eds.), German Colonialism: Race, the Holocaust, and Postwar Germany [Columbia University Press, forthcoming].

“Christoph Hochhäusler’s This Very Moment: The Berlin School and the Politics of Spatial Aesthetics in the German-Polish Borderlands,” in Brad Prager and Jaimey Fisher (eds.), The Collapse of the Conventional: The German Film and its Politics at the Turn of the New Century (Detroit: Wayne State UP, 2010), pp. 285-308. 

“Reinventing Poland as German Colonial Territory in the Nineteenth Century: Gustav Freytag's Soll und Haben as Colonial Novel,” in Robert L. Nelson (ed.), Germans, Poland, and Colonial Expansion to the East: 1850 Through the Present (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), pp. 11-37. 

“Peter Altenbergs literarischer Impressionismus,”in Kristin Kopp and Werner Michael Schwarz, (eds.),Peter Altenberg: Ashantee. Afrika und Wien um 1900(Vienna: Löcker Verlag, 2008), pp. 141-149.

“Reconfiguring the Border of Fortress Europe in Hans-Christian Schmid’s Lichter,” Germanic Review82.1 (Winter 2007), pp. 31-53.

“Ein Traumland Ost im deutschen Heimatfilm der 1950er Jahre? Kurt Hoffmanns Ich denke oft an Piroschka,” in Gregor Thum (ed.), Traumland Osten. Deutsche Bilder vom östlichen Europa im 20. Jahrhundert (Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2006), pp. 138-156. 

“Cartographic Claims: Colonial Mappings of Poland in German Territorial Revisionism,” in Gail Finney (ed.), Visual Culture in Twentieth-Century Germany: The Text as Spectacle (Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2006), pp. 199-213.

“’Ich stehe jetzt hier als einer von den Eroberern’: Soll und Haben als Kolonialroman,” in Florian Krobb (ed.), 150 Jahre 'Soll und Haben' (1855)Studien zu Gustav Freytags kontroversem Roman(Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann, 2005), pp. 225-237.

“Constructing Racial Difference in Colonial Poland,” in Eric Ames, Marcia Klotz, Lora Wildenthal (eds.), Germany’s Colonial Pasts (U of Nebraska P, 2005), pp. 76-96.

“Exterritorialized Heritage in Caroline Link’sNirgendwo in Afrika,” New German Critique 87 (Fall 2002), pp. 106–132.